What To Say When Your Art Isn’t Real

Not Real Art

Some people have this idea that their type of art is the only real art, and because your art doesn’t fit in their category of art, they feel the need to make you feel less than for your chosen medium and/or style.  So, what do we do with these people?

First of all, let’s look at the definition of art.  Merriam-Webster defines art as something that is created with imagination and skill and that is beautiful or that expresses important ideas or feelings.  This is a very broad definition that applies to many different styles.  Whether you’re doing graphite drawings or oil paintings, or abstract or realism, it all falls under the definition of art.

Everyone has preferences from food, movies, music, to more important things, like what they prefer in a future spouse.  It doesn’t mean the other person’s preference is wrong.  It’s just not right for you.

Usually the people who say you’re art isn’t real art, are very insecure about theirs.  So when the little monster comes around to tell you that you don’t make real art, kill it with a smile, and go make more art.  Remember, the little monster means you’re doing a good job actually making art instead of hiding in a closet.

Other Topics That Might Interest You:

https://shalevbasya.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/thoughts-on-beginning-artist-books/

https://shalevbasya.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/want-to-improve-your-work/

https://shalevbasya.wordpress.com/2016/01/21/multiple-art-incomes-2/

https://shalevbasya.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/how-to-not-get-bored-with-art/

https://shalevbasya.wordpress.com/2015/12/24/excuses/

Right Side vs Wrong Side Of the Paper

I’ve been experimenting with the “wrong” side of the paper.  It’s basically just the the smoother side of the paper.  It’s suppose to be better for getting finer detail and since I do more detailed work I thought I’d give it a try.  I really like the smoothness of it.  It actually makes me want to try out some hot press paper.  I’ll have to test that out and tell you my experience with that.  I didn’t notice too much of a difference in color, but I was able to get more of the detail I wanted because I didn’t have the grain of the paper getting in my way.  I also noticed that it dried flatter as well, which was interesting.

So I will probably use the other side of the paper from now on.  If you’re doing a style of painting that requires a lot of detail you might like using the other side, but if you’re going for a more impressionistic look the more textured side would probably work better.

If you try it out, let me know how goes for you!  Unfortunately I spilled my rinse water all over my painting so I don’t have a picture to show you for comparison, but I will soon.

Other Topics You Might Enjoy:

5 Beginning Watercolor Mistakes

Is Realistic Watercolor Possible?

Varnishing Watercolor Paper

3 Things Not To Do With Your Brushes

Staining vs Non-Staining Colors